Tree of heaven: can a mite reduce the spread of this highly invasive pest?

Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is an invasive, fast-growing deciduous tree that causes damage to infrastructure and hosts some invasive species. Scientists as CABI and BBCA have identified a mite that could significantly reduce its impact.
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Progress made on biological controls to fight crop pests in Malaysia

FAW fawligen effects
Scientists at CABI’s regional centre in Malaysia are making good progress in evaluating baculovirus-based biological solutions to manage a range of crop pests including fall armyworm, beet armyworm and diamondback moth.
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Ruffling parrot’s feathers: the biological control of Myriophyllum aquaticum

Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather
Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather, is an invasive aquatic weed. It can have roots underwater in depths of up to 1.5 metres with shoots that appear 20-50cm above the water surface. This makes it both a submerged and emergent plant. It is native to South America but is a popular garden and aquarium…
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Tuta absoluta: what is it and how do you get rid of it?

Tuta absoluta larva
This article was originally published on the CABI BioProtection Portal blog. Visit the original blog post here. Tuta absoluta (Phthorimaea absoluta) is a highly destructive tomato pest in many areas of the world. Native to Peru, it is a species of moth that can quickly damage entire tomato crops. 
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Devilweed: the ‘green invasion’ that’s destroying biodiversity and livelihoods

Chromolaena odorata devilweed
In a new video from BBC Earth, CABI’s Dr Arne Witt tells us about the devastating impact of Chromolaena odorata, commonly known as ‘Devilweed’. As part of the BBC’s Our Green Planet initiative, the video raises awareness about the impact of invasive species on biodiversity and livelihoods.
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Potential of parasitoid to control invasive fruit fly highlighted in study

cherry fruit trees
Drosophila suzukii, commonly known as Spotted Wing Drosophila, is an invasive fruit fly native to Eastern Asia that was accidentally introduced to the Americas and Europe in the late 2000s. It has since spread rapidly causing damage to over 150 wild and cultivated fruits like cherries, blueberries, strawberries, and even the fruits of ornamental plants.
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Can intercropping make fall armyworm’s natural enemies more effective?

Maize farmers intecropping with sunflowers
Native to tropical and sub-tropical America, the highly invasive fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda was first reported in Africa in 2016. The pest quickly spread to every country in sub-Saharan Africa, reaching Zambia in late 2016. Fall armyworm larvae feed on over 80 different host plants, including maize – a key subsistence crop for millions…
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Could Telenomus remus go global?

colourful maize varieties
The parasitoid wasp Telenomus remus has been mass released as a biological control agent against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in the Americas (where the pest is native) for a number of years. However, fall armyworm is now highly invasive, found across Africa, Asia, and Australia. Can the lessons learnt from its wide use in the…
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Satellite data offers alternative in predicting impact of biological control for hay-fever causing ragweed

Ophraella communa (Ragweed Leaf Beetle); adult. Rock Creek Park,
New research – published in the journal Ecological Modelling – reveals an alternative method of predicting population trends through temperature of the leaf beetle Ophraella communa, a potential biological control agent of the hay-fever causing ragweed Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe.
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Women and girls in science: An interview with Hariet Hinz

Female scientists. Hariet Hinz
Female scientists have the potential to play an important role in the future of agriculture, however, a significant gender gap persists, particularly in agriculture and science.   Gender and youth is a key area for CABI. Constituting to Sustainable Development Goal 5, CABI’s goal is to create opportunities for women and young people in agriculture.   In…
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