Using online workshops to ensure the fight against invasive species continues in Pakistan

As the global COVID-19 pandemic continues, CABI is ensuring that efforts to combat invasive species are continuing. The CABI centre in Pakistan organized a one-day online workshop on the development of Pest Management Decision Guides (PMDGs) and Technical Briefs on the invasive pests: fall armyworm, parthenium weed, and Tuta absoluta.
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The future of fall armyworm research

As COVID-19 forces more and more people indoors, the challenges facing scientific research do not diminish. If anything, the sudden requirement to maintain a sensible distance between colleagues serves only to highlight the lack of resources currently available to facilitate remote working and collaboration in research circles.
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Enabling access to FAIR and open agricultural data: CABI’s Action on Invasives takes the lead

Two CABI scientists inspect tomato plants
For many centuries, data has been used in agriculture to help farmers, researchers and policymakers make more informed decisions. For instance, farmers use weather and soil data to decide how and when to fertilise, plant or harvest; and policymakers use data about the impact of pest and disease management interventions during evidence-based decision making.
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Open Access tools for Open Science

Plant doctor using a tablet at an e-plant clinic in India
Each year on November 10th, World Science Day for Peace and Development celebrates the significance of science in daily life and the importance of involving the public in scientific developments and debates. This year, the theme for World Science Day for Peace and Development is “Open science, leaving no one behind”. The concept of “Open…
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New Pest Risk Analysis Tool to improve biosecurity in international trade of plant commodities

Colorado beetle eats potato leaves. Pests destroy a crop in the field. Parasites in wildlife and agriculture. Asia Pacific Regional Consultation 2018 China
CABI has launched a new product to help facilitate and improve the biosecurity of plants and plant products being traded around the world that are at risk of invasive pests such as the Colorado beetle – a major threat to potato crops.
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UAV spraying: combating the spread of fall armyworm across China

Fall armyworm (FAW) has continued to spread across China since early January, with the pest being identified in over 600,000 hectares of farmland across 18 provinces. Now, the government and farmers are looking for solutions to tackling this invasive species. Fall armyworm in an incredibly destructive pest species native to the tropics and sub-tropics of…
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Reaching more farmers with fall armyworm knowledge and information through ICT-enabled extension

Since 2017, CABI and partners have launched a series of extension campaigns in Kenya and Uganda in the fight against the invasive pest fall armyworm. These campaigns used integrated ICT-enabled approaches combining radio, SMS, and community video screenings with the aim of improving awareness, knowledge and management practices for fall armyworm. Although smallholder agriculture is…
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Indian farmers using smartphones to fight fast-moving crop killer

By Eric Marx. Reblogged from Ethical Corporation. Plantix is a diagnostic app that uses image recognition software and AI. It is being used to halt the advance of the fall armyworm pest. An app that uses artificial intelligence to identify plant disease is being deployed in India as an early-warning system to stop the advance…
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Largest Invasive Alien Plant dataset is now published online!

By Samantha Garvin. Reblogged from JRS Biodiversity Foundation. CABI has published one of the most complete and current datasets on Invasive Alien Plants (IAP) in East and Southern Africa. This extraordinary dataset is already being translated into new research findings and conservation action on the ground.
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The Value of Testing

Reblogged from the Nesta blog. The crop damage caused by fall armyworm has put millions of livelihoods at stake across Sub-Saharan Africa. Its rapid spread has been projected to cause losses valuing $2.5 billion to $6.2 billion per year if left unabated.[1] Fall armyworm has caused havoc for smallholder farmers across the region and become a…
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