Invasives Most Read 2018

Parthenium in Pakistan

2018 has been a bumper year for the CABI Invasives blog, with 4 times more posts than 2017 and over twice the number of views (almost 20,000!). With so many articles published this year, we have compiled a list of the top 20 most read to round off 2018.

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New upgraded invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool launched

Nezara viridula (green stink bug); mated pair, on pearl millet (

Last week CABI launched the full version of its invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool, a free and open access online resource available via the Invasive Species Compendium that helps users make decisions about invasive species and identify possible risks in countries, provinces and states.

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When astronomers meet ecologists: how remote sensing can tackle Parthenium in Pakistan

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“Usually I’m looking up at the stars but with this project, I’m back down to earth” quips Dr Rene Breton, Director of Research at the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester. By combining the skills of a geographer, ecologist, social scientist, entomologist, astrophysicist, biologist, and electrical engineer, the joint CABI and University of Manchester team aim to capitalise on the unique skills from each subject to tackle the highly invasive weed Parthenium in Pakistan using remote sensing.

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CABI unveils action plan to fight highly invasive and destructive weed

Parthenium weed causes harm to the environment, health, as well as the economy.

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CABI has launched a comprehensive action plan aimed at combating the scourge of Parthenium, a highly invasive species of weed, prevalent and spreading in Pakistan.

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Largest Invasive Alien Plant dataset is now published online!

By Samantha Garvin. Reblogged from JRS Biodiversity Foundation.

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Lantana Camara is an invasive species in East and Southern Africa

CABI has published one of the most complete and current datasets on Invasive Alien Plants (IAP) in East and Southern Africa. This extraordinary dataset is already being translated into new research findings and conservation action on the ground.

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Tackle invasive species to restore degraded landscapes

By Gilbert Nakweya
Reblogged from SciDev.Net

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Prosopis and Lantana, two invasive woody shrubs that have been encroaching on Kenyan grazing and agricultural lands. Copyright: Panos

Invasive alien species should not be used in restoring degraded landscapes as their costs outweigh their benefits, experts say.

Invasive alien species, according to the Convention on Biological Diversity, are plants, animals and other organisms that are non-native to an ecosystem, and may adversely affect human health and the environment, including decline or elimination of native species.

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New research assesses the effect of invasive crayfish on mosquito survival

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American Red Swamp Crayfish; Photo Credit © Shutter stock

Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), often known as the Louisiana crawfish are staple part of Cajun cuisine. However, new research published in Conservation Biology has found that the highly invasive crayfish allows mosquitoes to thrive in waterways, therefore making it more likely to increase the risk of mosquito-borne diseases.  Continue reading