DNA from thin air: could invasive species be monitored using airborne DNA?

DNA
Invasive species are notoriously challenging to track due to their ability to rapidly spread from one habitat to another, whilst their impacts on endangered species can be even more difficult to detect. Two new studies published in the journal Current Biology have now shown that it is possible to accurately identify a variety of animal…
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CABI research referenced in study assessing potential spread of fall armyworm in Africa and beyond

Extension-worker-in-Yambio-showing-the-FAW-larvae-on-maize
A new study looking at the potential distribution of the devastating fall armyworm in Africa and beyond with emphasis on the influence of climate change and irrigation patterns has drawn upon previous research and expertise from CABI.
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Invasives most read blogs 2021

As 2021 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the most read blogs on the Invasives Blog this year. Plus some firm favourites. Invasive species like Himalayan balsam, fall armyworm, and Tuta absoluta proved to be popular topics for our readers this year. CABI’s work in biological control around the world also grabbed readers’…
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First parthenium biocontrol agent approved for release in Pakistan

Parthenium in Pakistan
The stem boring weevil Listronotus steosipennis has been approved for release as a biocontrol agent for the management of Parthenium hysterophorus in Pakistan. Parthenium has spread throughout much of the country causing problems in both rural and urban areas. It is hoped this weevil will prove a sustainable and effective management option for this invasive…
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Natural enemy shows early promise in fight against Japanese knotweed in the Netherlands

JK1
A natural enemy – identified and reared by CABI scientists – to fight the scourge of Japanese knotweed in the Netherlands is showing early signs of success, a meeting of stakeholders heard recently.
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St Kitts and Nevis launches campaign to raise awareness of Invasive Alien Species

red-lionfish-g92342831b_1280
The Minister of Environment for the Government of St Kitts and Nevis has officially launched a communication, education and public awareness campaign for the CABI-led project ‘Preventing Costs of Invasive Alien Species (IAS).’
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Low hanging fruits? Papaya mealybug in Kenya and search for a biological solution

Mr-Mutondi
The potential and importance of papaya production in Kenya cannot be overemphasised. It is ranked fourth most important fruit crop in Kenya after oranges, mangoes and bananas, writes Fernadis Makale, Research Officer, Invasive Species Management based at CABI’s Africa Centre in Nairobi, Kenya.
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Saying “no” to harmful chemicals in cotton crop production

Naveed-Ayub-farm-3
This is the story of farmer Mr Naveed Ayoub from district Tando Allahyar, Pakistan. He has 10 acres of fertile land where he has cultivated all kinds of vegetables along with cotton crops for many years. He previously felt he had no choice but to use chemical pesticides to control pests on his farm but…
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Tolerance and range of Tuta absoluta may have been underestimated, study suggests

Phthorimaea absoluta in Kenya
The environmental tolerances and potential range of the tomato pest Tuta absoluta in Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Central Asia and Australia may have been underestimated according to new research co-authored by CABI scientists.
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COP26: climate change and its impact on invasive species

COP 26 and invasive species
Climate change is having an important influence on invasive species. The increase in temperatures, rainfall, humidity and drought can facilitate their spread and establishment, creating new opportunities for them to become invasive.
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