Tree of heaven: can a mite reduce the spread of this highly invasive pest?

Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is an invasive, fast-growing deciduous tree that causes damage to infrastructure and hosts some invasive species. Scientists as CABI and BBCA have identified a mite that could significantly reduce its impact.
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CABI collaborates on research suggesting Asia is a ‘genetic melting pot’ for fall armyworm

CABI scientists from its regional centre in Malaysia have collaborated on new research which suggests Asia is a ‘biosecurity hotspot’ and a ‘genetic melting pot’ for the devastating crop pest fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda).
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Invasive snails: 4 species leaving a trail of destruction

Rosy predator snail
Invasive snails are some of the most damaging invasive species in the world. In invaded regions, they pose a threat to the environment, the economy, and in some cases, human health. Find out more about four of these invasive snails, including their native region, how they became established in invaded areas and the threat they…
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Progress made on biological controls to fight crop pests in Malaysia

FAW fawligen effects
Scientists at CABI’s regional centre in Malaysia are making good progress in evaluating baculovirus-based biological solutions to manage a range of crop pests including fall armyworm, beet armyworm and diamondback moth.
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Ruffling parrot’s feathers: the biological control of Myriophyllum aquaticum

Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather
Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather, is an invasive aquatic weed. It can have roots underwater in depths of up to 1.5 metres with shoots that appear 20-50cm above the water surface. This makes it both a submerged and emergent plant. It is native to South America but is a popular garden and aquarium…
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Biological pest control helps tackle swarms of desert locusts in Africa

biological pest control of desert locusts
This article was originally published on the CABI BioProtection Portal blog. Visit the original blog post here. Biopesticides have been leading the non-chemical pest control assault on swarms of locusts in Somalia, helping to control, without the use of harmful chemical pesticides, one of the most destructive agricultural pests in world: Schistocerca gregaria, commonly known as the desert locust.
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5 UK invasive species and their impact on native wildlife

Buddleja
Invasive species are one of the main causes of biodiversity loss globally. They significantly alter ecosystems and even drive native plants and animals to extinction. Over 2,000 non-native plants and animals have been introduced to the UK, and around 10-15% have become invasive. They cost the economy over £1.7 billion every year.
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Technology in the skies fights desert locust

Spray-Drone-with-jerry-can-for-carrying-pesticides
In early 2020, thousands of Kenyan farmers and rural communities suffered a severe disaster following desert locust invasion which destroyed their crops.
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Carol Ellison Science Award winner highlights locust research at her first international scientific conference

Violet-3
Violet Ochieng is the first winner of the inaugural Carol Ellison Science Award 2021 which is awarded to a student doing her/his research with CABI – with the objective of enriching their research experience with the organisation. Violet, from the University of Nairobi, is being supervised for her PhD by Dr Ivan Rwomushana – CABI’s…
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Tuta absoluta: what is it and how do you get rid of it?

Tuta absoluta larva
This article was originally published on the CABI BioProtection Portal blog. Visit the original blog post here. Tuta absoluta (Phthorimaea absoluta) is a highly destructive tomato pest in many areas of the world. Native to Peru, it is a species of moth that can quickly damage entire tomato crops. 
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