Ruffling parrot’s feathers: the biological control of Myriophyllum aquaticum

Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather
Myriophyllum aquaticum, commonly known as parrot’s feather, is an invasive aquatic weed. It can have roots underwater in depths of up to 1.5 metres with shoots that appear 20-50cm above the water surface. This makes it both a submerged and emergent plant. It is native to South America but is a popular garden and aquarium…
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Biological pest control helps tackle swarms of desert locusts in Africa

biological pest control of desert locusts
This article was originally published on the CABI BioProtection Portal blog. Visit the original blog post here. Biopesticides have been leading the non-chemical pest control assault on swarms of locusts in Somalia, helping to control, without the use of harmful chemical pesticides, one of the most destructive agricultural pests in world: Schistocerca gregaria, commonly known as the desert locust.
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5 UK invasive species and their impact on native wildlife

Buddleja
Invasive species are one of the main causes of biodiversity loss globally. They significantly alter ecosystems and even drive native plants and animals to extinction. Over 2,000 non-native plants and animals have been introduced to the UK, and around 10-15% have become invasive. They cost the economy over £1.7 billion every year.
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Technology in the skies fights desert locust

Spray-Drone-with-jerry-can-for-carrying-pesticides
In early 2020, thousands of Kenyan farmers and rural communities suffered a severe disaster following desert locust invasion which destroyed their crops.
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Carol Ellison Science Award winner highlights locust research at her first international scientific conference

Violet-3
Violet Ochieng is the first winner of the inaugural Carol Ellison Science Award 2021 which is awarded to a student doing her/his research with CABI – with the objective of enriching their research experience with the organisation. Violet, from the University of Nairobi, is being supervised for her PhD by Dr Ivan Rwomushana – CABI’s…
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Tuta absoluta: what is it and how do you get rid of it?

Tuta absoluta larva
This article was originally published on the CABI BioProtection Portal blog. Visit the original blog post here. Tuta absoluta (Phthorimaea absoluta) is a highly destructive tomato pest in many areas of the world. Native to Peru, it is a species of moth that can quickly damage entire tomato crops. 
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Devilweed: the ‘green invasion’ that’s destroying biodiversity and livelihoods

Chromolaena odorata devilweed
In a new video from BBC Earth, CABI’s Dr Arne Witt tells us about the devastating impact of Chromolaena odorata, commonly known as ‘Devilweed’. As part of the BBC’s Our Green Planet initiative, the video raises awareness about the impact of invasive species on biodiversity and livelihoods.
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CABI contributes to first Pan-African Nematology Network workshop in Kenya

PANEMA-workshop2
CABI has contributed its expertise in the field of nematology at the first Pan-African Nematology Network (PANEMA) workshop held at the EKA Hotel in Eldoret, Kenya.
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Help improve the Invasive Species Compendium’s latest decision-support tool

Nymph on leaf
Are you interested in a list of invasive plants in Australia negatively affecting agriculture? Or a list of invasive insects in Hawaii that can be introduced via contaminated clothing? Maybe you want to know which vertebrate invasives cause ecosystem changes or habitat alteration…?
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Coordinating body urgently needed to help improve Bangladesh’s invasive alien species system

Bang-invasives
A new CABI-led study is recommending that a coordinating body is established to help improve weaknesses in Bangladesh’s Invasive Alien Species (IAS) system to facilitate engagement between all actors involved in IAS management – from trade to human health.
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