First parthenium biocontrol agent approved for release in Pakistan

Parthenium in Pakistan
The stem boring weevil Listronotus steosipennis has been approved for release as a biocontrol agent for the management of Parthenium hysterophorus in Pakistan. Parthenium has spread throughout much of the country causing problems in both rural and urban areas. It is hoped this weevil will prove a sustainable and effective management option for this invasive…
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COP26: climate change and its impact on invasive species

COP 26 and invasive species
Climate change is having an important influence on invasive species. The increase in temperatures, rainfall, humidity and drought can facilitate their spread and establishment, creating new opportunities for them to become invasive.
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On Earth Day, we take a look at the sustainable control of invasive species

Locusts in a field
Today is Earth Day – a day when people around the world show their support for environmental protection. CABI’s vision is for a world in which the agricultural sector is embedded in a healthy and climate resilient landscape with clean water and air, healthy soils and functional ecosystem services, and where biodiversity is safeguarded through…
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Extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for devastating fruit and nut pest

Halyomorpha halys brown marmorated stink bug on leaf
Scientists fear that extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for the devastating fruit and nut pest – the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) – which is already posing a significant risk to crops in Europe, North America and East Asia where it originates.
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Planting invasive species could make our carbon problem worse

This article was originally published on Popular Science Fast-growing vegetation can reduce carbon stored underground. The radiata pine has unwittingly taken root across the world. Its native range is confined to a small section of the California coast and a few islands along Baja California. Today, millions of acres of the tree are spread across South America,…
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Sentinel trees: an early warning system for new invasive threats

With increased levels of human development, transportation and changing climates, we are seeing greater instances of invasive species introduction and spread across all continents. Such invasive species can cause significant ecological and economical impacts in targeted areas, for example the elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes) which spread across Europe from North American log transports and…
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Scientists uncover how invasive plants gain a head start after fire

This article was originally published by the University of Western Australia. Read the original article. New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources.
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CABI shares expertise on highly noxious and invasive parthenium weed at international conference on climate smart agriculture

Parthenium in Pakistan
By Dr Kazam Ali, Biocontrol Research Officer – CABI Central and West Asia (CWA) International conferences are priceless opportunities, not only for researchers and scientists but also for experts, policy makers, stakeholders and students, to ‘sharpen your saw’ by learning new skills in a different environment.
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Invasive species hitch a ride on marine litter

We are more aware than ever of the impact of pollution on marine life, from ingestion and entanglement in manmade waste, through to the discovery of microplastics within microorganisms, fish and large mammals. One perhaps overlooked impact is its role in the spread of invasive species. Acting as a raft on which potential invasive species…
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CABI joins international team of scientists calling for a Global Surveillance System to fight crop diseases

CABI has joined an international team of scientists calling for a Global Surveillance System (GSS) to fight a range of diseases which threaten priority crops including maize, potato, cassava, rice, beans and wheat. The team, which includes the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) – lead authors of a new report published in Science (28 June 2019),…
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