Devilweed: the ‘green invasion’ that’s destroying biodiversity and livelihoods

Chromolaena odorata devilweed
In a new video from BBC Earth, CABI’s Dr Arne Witt tells us about the devastating impact of Chromolaena odorata, commonly known as ‘Devilweed’. As part of the BBC’s Our Green Planet initiative, the video raises awareness about the impact of invasive species on biodiversity and livelihoods.
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Women and girls in science: An interview with Hariet Hinz

Female scientists. Hariet Hinz
Female scientists have the potential to play an important role in the future of agriculture, however, a significant gender gap persists, particularly in agriculture and science.   Gender and youth is a key area for CABI. Constituting to Sustainable Development Goal 5, CABI’s goal is to create opportunities for women and young people in agriculture.   In…
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Women and girls in science: An interview with Chapwa Kasoma

Women and Girls in Science, Chapwa Kasoma
This month’s International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to engage women and girls in science. As part of this international day, we are highlighting some of the invaluable work CABI’s female scientists do in the field of agricultural science.   Zambia-based Chapwa Kasoma is a postdoctoral research fellow in invasive species management. We…
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First parthenium biocontrol agent approved for release in Pakistan

Parthenium in Pakistan
The stem boring weevil Listronotus steosipennis has been approved for release as a biocontrol agent for the management of Parthenium hysterophorus in Pakistan. Parthenium has spread throughout much of the country causing problems in both rural and urban areas. It is hoped this weevil will prove a sustainable and effective management option for this invasive…
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COP26: climate change and its impact on invasive species

COP 26 and invasive species
Climate change is having an important influence on invasive species. The increase in temperatures, rainfall, humidity and drought can facilitate their spread and establishment, creating new opportunities for them to become invasive.
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On Earth Day, we take a look at the sustainable control of invasive species

Locusts in a field
Today is Earth Day – a day when people around the world show their support for environmental protection. CABI’s vision is for a world in which the agricultural sector is embedded in a healthy and climate resilient landscape with clean water and air, healthy soils and functional ecosystem services, and where biodiversity is safeguarded through…
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Extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for devastating fruit and nut pest

Halyomorpha halys brown marmorated stink bug on leaf
Scientists fear that extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for the devastating fruit and nut pest – the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) – which is already posing a significant risk to crops in Europe, North America and East Asia where it originates.
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Planting invasive species could make our carbon problem worse

This article was originally published on Popular Science Fast-growing vegetation can reduce carbon stored underground. The radiata pine has unwittingly taken root across the world. Its native range is confined to a small section of the California coast and a few islands along Baja California. Today, millions of acres of the tree are spread across South America,…
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Sentinel trees: an early warning system for new invasive threats

With increased levels of human development, transportation and changing climates, we are seeing greater instances of invasive species introduction and spread across all continents. Such invasive species can cause significant ecological and economical impacts in targeted areas, for example the elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes) which spread across Europe from North American log transports and…
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Scientists uncover how invasive plants gain a head start after fire

This article was originally published by the University of Western Australia. Read the original article. New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources.
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