Tackling the scale insect problem in Kenya

Scale insects on leaf
Scale insects are a group of very small insects that often don’t look like an average plant pest, but they are a growing problem in countries like Kenya. The pests attack important crops and plants that are integral to the country’s economy such as coffee, citrus and mango and in some cases have been known…
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Do invasive species impact men and women differently?

women clear invasive prickly pear with invasive prosopis in the background
We know that invasive species – whose introduction and spread threaten biodiversity – disproportionately affect communities in poor rural areas who depend on agriculture and natural resources for their livelihood. But do gender roles and relationships in agriculture influence the way men and women experience the impact of invasive species?
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Extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for devastating fruit and nut pest

Halyomorpha halys brown marmorated stink bug on leaf
Scientists fear that extreme climate change could ‘more than double’ areas suitable for the devastating fruit and nut pest – the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) – which is already posing a significant risk to crops in Europe, North America and East Asia where it originates.
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Fostering collaborations for utilizing and promoting biocontrol agents to fight fall armyworm in Bangladesh

By Nirmal K. Dutta, Debasish Sarker, Manju Thakur, and Malvika Chaudhary Driven by changing climatic conditions and by increases in globalization and trade, the highly destructive pest, fall armyworm (FAW) has made its way towards Asia after invading Africa. After being reported in India in 2018, it was subsequently reported by other countries in Asia…
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Endophyte may protect tomatoes from Tuta absoluta pest attack

Healthy tomato crop
Successful colonization of tomato seedlings with Beauveria bassiana fungus could reduce crop losses  Trials in Brazil suggest seedling inoculation with the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana could be a viable commercial option for marketing pre-colonized tomato plants ‘resistant’ to the tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta.
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New paper calls for scientific diplomacy in plant health

Co-authored by leading plant health community representatives a newly-published paper calls for an international research collaboration in the fight against plant pests and diseases. The paper, published in Nature Plants, brought together 28 institutions, including CABI,  and analyses new perspectives and challenges on global phytosanitary research coordination; particularly as human trade and movement continues to…
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Study brief explores outcomes and lessons learnt from fall armyworm management plan in Ghana

A team of CABI and Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) scientists have shared their expertise on invasive species and development communications and extension to publish a new CABI Study Brief looking at the outcomes and lessons learnt from the implementation of a fall armyworm management plan in Ghana.
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Invasive weeds in America’s Western states: restoring balance using biological control

In many of America’s Western states, invasive weeds such as houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), yellow and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria vulgaris and Linaria dalmatica), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), and hoary cress (Lepidium draba) are serious problems. However, research shows that biological control, as part of an integrated weed management strategy, offers the potential for a cost effective and efficient way of reducing invasive plant species to levels below acceptable damage thresholds.
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Invasive Species Compendium use grows in 2020

In the first half of 2020, CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) had over 1.5 million visits, around double the number for the same period in 2019. How much of this is down to the demand for high quality content and improvements that have been made to the site, and how much is down to people…
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FAW Infestation: CABI, MoFA, others explore safe & sustainable management control

As part of efforts to sustainably manage the Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Ghana, the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s (MoFA) Plant Protection Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) in collaboration with the University of Ghana Soil and Irrigation Research Centre (SIREC) at Kpong have begun exploring biological control options for safe and sustainable management of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in the country.
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