Study brief explores outcomes and lessons learnt from fall armyworm management plan in Ghana

A team of CABI and Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) scientists have shared their expertise on invasive species and development communications and extension to publish a new CABI Study Brief looking at the outcomes and lessons learnt from the implementation of a fall armyworm management plan in Ghana.
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Invasive weeds in America’s Western states: restoring balance using biological control

In many of America’s Western states, invasive weeds such as houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), yellow and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria vulgaris and Linaria dalmatica), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), and hoary cress (Lepidium draba) are serious problems. However, research shows that biological control, as part of an integrated weed management strategy, offers the potential for a cost effective and efficient way of reducing invasive plant species to levels below acceptable damage thresholds.
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Invasive Species Compendium use grows in 2020

In the first half of 2020, CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) had over 1.5 million visits, around double the number for the same period in 2019. How much of this is down to the demand for high quality content and improvements that have been made to the site, and how much is down to people…
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FAW Infestation: CABI, MoFA, others explore safe & sustainable management control

As part of efforts to sustainably manage the Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Ghana, the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s (MoFA) Plant Protection Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) in collaboration with the University of Ghana Soil and Irrigation Research Centre (SIREC) at Kpong have begun exploring biological control options for safe and sustainable management of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in the country.
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The ongoing challenge of tackling Himalayan balsam in the British Isles

Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera), an invasive species native to the foothills of the Himalayas, is an extremely problematic weed in the British Isles, and one of the species CABI is working to help control in the natural environment.
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CABI refurbishes MoFA laboratory for biological control of invasive species in Ghana

Through its global Action on Invasives (AoI) programme, CABI has refurbished a laboratory housed by the Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA-PPRSD). The lab supports research efforts aimed at discovering and promoting locally practicable biological control solutions for managing invasive species in Ghana. The refurbishment consisted of…
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Tomato farmers in Kenya believe area-wide pest management can easily be instituted and effectively control Tuta absoluta

Tuta absoluta in Kenya
Tomato is one of the most important vegetables grown in Kenya and plays a critical role in income generation and creation of employment for both rural and urban populations, in addition to meeting food nutritional requirements. Tuta absoluta – also known as tomato leafminer – is a native of South America (Peru) and is one…
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‘A consortium is needed to combat the menace of Parthenium in Pakistan’

CABI in Pakistan, in collaboration with the University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF), arranged a seminar on ‘Research–academia linkages on parthenium’ held at New Senate Hall, on 9th June. Addressing the participants, UAF Vice Chancellor Prof. Muhammad Ashraf explained that parthenium is spreading at an alarming rate across the country and there is a clear need for…
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Planting invasive species could make our carbon problem worse

This article was originally published on Popular Science Fast-growing vegetation can reduce carbon stored underground. The radiata pine has unwittingly taken root across the world. Its native range is confined to a small section of the California coast and a few islands along Baja California. Today, millions of acres of the tree are spread across South America,…
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Sentinel trees: an early warning system for new invasive threats

With increased levels of human development, transportation and changing climates, we are seeing greater instances of invasive species introduction and spread across all continents. Such invasive species can cause significant ecological and economical impacts in targeted areas, for example the elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes) which spread across Europe from North American log transports and…
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