CABI shares expertise on hay fever sufferers’ nightmare on US TV

Ragweed
Dr Stefan Toepfer has contributed to WGRZ-TV’s The Outdoors programme on Invasive Species by sharing his expertise on ragweed – the invasive species that is a nightmare for millions of hay fever sufferers across Europe.
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How plant hunters sowed the seeds of garden invaders

Rhododendron ponticum
Plant hunters introduced many of the UK’s most damaging invasive species as botanical status symbols in the Victorian era. Initially, the impact of plant hunting for sought-after specimens, such as camellia and rhododendrons, was largely unknown. However, without natural predators from their home range, these plants grew uncontrollably in British gardens and spread into the…
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Invasive aquatic weeds: 5 unwanted plants to look out for 

Invasive aquatic weeds are causing serious problems across water bodies. With their ability to spread quickly, they outcompete native aquatic plants.
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Deadly cane toads make their mark on Australian wildlife and habitats

cane toad close up
The cane toad (Rhinella marina), also known as the giant toad, is a poisonous amphibian which is wreaking havoc throughout Australia. Native to South America, Central America and Mexico, the cane toad was introduced to many countries to help control agricultural pests.
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Invasives most read blogs 2022

As 2022 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the most read blogs on the Invasives Blog this year. Plus some firm favourites. Invasive species like golden apple snail, fall armyworm, and Tuta absoluta proved to be popular topics for our readers this year. CABI’s work in biological control around the world also grabbed…
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Zebra mussels disrupt ecosystems in Europe and North America

zebra mussel cluster
Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are fingernail-sized freshwater molluscs that are native to the lakes of south-east Russia. In the last 200 years they have spread to parts of Europe, including Britain and Ireland, and North America.
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Russian knapweed biological control success with host specific wasps and midges

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By Sonya Daly, Dan Bean and Melanie Mollack of the Colorado Department of Agriculture, Conservation Services, Biological Control Program. Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens) is a nonnative weed in the western United States. It was introduced in the late 1800’s and is now invading and degrading cropland, rangeland, riparian areas, and roadsides.
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Can beneficial insects control parthenium weed in Pakistan to safeguard crops?

Can biological control of parthenium in Pakistan safeguard crops? Last month, leaders worldwide focused on climate change at COP27. One critical subject has been the impact of global warming on food production. Rising temperatures have had terrible effects on crops. This is because they can help spread invasive alien species (IAS), including weeds, which can…
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Jumping worms unearth problems for forest ecosystems

jumping worm
The Asian jumping worm (Amynthas agrestis), also known as the crazy worm, is a litter dwelling earthworm which can harm forests and biodiversity by changing the soil structure and forest floor vegetation.
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Symposium highlights advances in global pest management for greater sustainable food security

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CABI scientists have shared their expertise in safer-to-use and more sustainable biological control agents for the global management of crop pests and diseases which can threaten the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and food security.
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