Training of trainers on de-linting of cotton seed to ensure quality of crop

cotton
By Rauf Ahmed Khan Laghari, Project Manager, CABI Cotton is a principal cash crop of Pakistan but unfortunately is attacked by number of pests and diseases. When pests take over the crop, production cost of cotton rises and profit is squeezed thus, there is always a competition between farmer and the pest’s interest.
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Rooting out ‘monster’ invasive weeds and pests from space

This article was originally published on SciDev.Net. Read the original article. Parthenium is a highly invasive weed that has spread to about 50 countries worldwide, threating agricultural productivity, biodiversity, ecosystems, and human and animal health. A major struggle to eliminate, parthenium can have heart-­breaking impacts – it has been estimated to cause crop yield losses…
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Communication is key: CABI publishes framework for strategic communications during pest outbreaks

The invasion of a highly destructive plant pest can have a devastating effect on farmers’ crop production, natural ecosystems and economic trade. In Africa, where a large proportion of people live in rural areas and rely on subsistence agriculture, invasive species can cause severe damage and seriously impact food and nutritional security.
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Is parthenium’s stem boring weevil safe for release in Pakistan? An update on host range testing

Dr Kazam Ali examining Tagetes erecta plant species for any eggs
Native to tropical America, Parthenium hysterophorus, commonly known as parthenium, has invaded and become a major weed in over 50 countries. Parthenium has covered thousands of hectares of productive and range land in Pakistan. It is an annual herb which effects agriculture, damages biodiversity, affects human and animal health and adversely impacts economic development.
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Scientists uncover how invasive plants gain a head start after fire

This article was originally published by the University of Western Australia. Read the original article. New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources.
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The future of fall armyworm research

As COVID-19 forces more and more people indoors, the challenges facing scientific research do not diminish. If anything, the sudden requirement to maintain a sensible distance between colleagues serves only to highlight the lack of resources currently available to facilitate remote working and collaboration in research circles.
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Women and Parthenium management in Pakistan

Last year, CABI in Pakistan in collaboration with University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (UAF) conducted a series of seminars in rural areas of Pakistan. The aim was to highlight the damages being caused by Parthenium weed to humans, livestock and biodiversity. As part of this, teams ensured inclusiveness of rural women as major stakeholders due to…
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Preparando al productor para luchar contra el cogollero

El gusano cogollero (Spodoptera fugiperda) y otros gusanos masticadores son llamados “Langostas” por los productores en Somotillo y municipios aledaños, quizás devido a que la defoliación severa que causan les recuerda el daño causado por la langosta del desierto (Schistocerca gregaria). El cogollero es la plaga de mayor importancia para la producción de maíz en Nicaragua, sobre todo en el ciclo de primera, especialmente en localidades dentro del ‘corredor seco’ como Somotillo.
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Dogs can sniff out huanglongbing months before symptoms appear

Study finds that using dogs to survey for citrus greening disease is more accurate and efficient than current methods. Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, is a bacterial disease of citrus plants cause by Candidatus Liberibacter spp. It is thought to have been primarily an insect endophyte, but made the jump to its alternative host – citrus plants…
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European ash trees resist devastating insect pest

Ash trees may be more prepared to face invasive threats than previously realised. The European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is a common site in towns, forests and parkland across the United Kingdom. Since the 1990s, ash trees across Europe have been devastated by ash dieback, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus), which has…
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