Enabling access to FAIR and open agricultural data: CABI’s Action on Invasives takes the lead

Two CABI scientists inspect tomato plants
For many centuries, data has been used in agriculture to help farmers, researchers and policymakers make more informed decisions. For instance, farmers use weather and soil data to decide how and when to fertilise, plant or harvest; and policymakers use data about the impact of pest and disease management interventions during evidence-based decision making.
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New study: current resource use in areas of increasing prosopis cover is unsustainable

By Dr Urs Schaffner, Head Ecosystems Management In a newly-published paper in the journal Ecosystems Services: ‘The impact of invasive species on social-ecological systems: Relating supply and use of selected provisioning ecosystem services’, CABI scientists joined an international team of researchers who, in respect of the invasive weed prosopis, conducted the first study that integrates…
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Invasives Most Read 2019

As 2019 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the year’s most read articles. Plus some firm favourites. Fall armyworm continues to be a popular topic for our readers and this year, blogs on biocontrol efforts to control the invasive caterpillar make the top 20. CABI’s Pest Risk Analysis tool…
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Invading Europe’s waterways: the crayfish occupation

An (invasive) signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, crossing a road in Oxford.
Crayfish are freshwater crustaceans that can be found in a range of freshwater habitats, from fast-flowing rivers to swamps and ditches. Even in places where they are abundant, they are secretive and not commonly seen, so the ongoing widespread invasion by non-native crayfish species is unknown to many.
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Work like a dog: Sniffing out Japanese Knotweed

Native species are disappearing forever because of alien invasions. Never before has it cost the environment, economy and tax payer more, and decline has never been more rapid than in the last 30 years.  Following New-Zealand’s trailblazing government-funded model, we have every reason to believe we can tackle invasive weed management better around the world…
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CABI shares expertise on highly noxious and invasive parthenium weed at international conference on climate smart agriculture

By Dr Kazam Ali, Biocontrol Research Officer – CABI Central and West Asia (CWA) International conferences are priceless opportunities, not only for researchers and scientists but also for experts, policy makers, stakeholders and students, to ‘sharpen your saw’ by learning new skills in a different environment.
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Invasive parakeets disrupt Hawaii’s agriculture

Parakeet eats fruit from a tree
Originally published on Island Conservation Community members look for solutions to the threat of invasive Rose-ringed Parakeets in Kauai which are impacting native wildlife and the economy.
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Study finds endoparasitoid wasp can reduce fall armyworm leaf consumption rate by up to 89%

Coccygidium luteum (Brullé)
In a recently published study led by CABI, researchers assessed, under lab conditions, the effect of the endoparasitoid wasp, Coccygidium luteum on the leaf rate consumption of its host – fall armyworm larvae.
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New hope for trees affected by ash dieback

Originally published on BBC Science & Environment Scientists say there is new hope in the fight against a disease that is devastating ash trees. A study has identified the genes that give trees resistance to ash dieback, which arrived in the UK in 2012 and has now spread to almost every part of the country.
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Meet the man behind the headlines: The ‘Stink Bug Man’ Dr Tim Haye

Tim Haye spends a lot of his time behind the lens of a microscope or camera studying and capturing a range of invasive pests – largely unseen to the human eye.  Recently Tim has been the focus of attention himself with the Swiss media keen on learning more about one of his ‘bugbears’ – the…
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