Potential of parasitoid to control invasive fruit fly highlighted in study

cherry fruit trees
Drosophila suzukii, commonly known as Spotted Wing Drosophila, is an invasive fruit fly native to Eastern Asia that was accidentally introduced to the Americas and Europe in the late 2000s. It has since spread rapidly causing damage to over 150 wild and cultivated fruits like cherries, blueberries, strawberries, and even the fruits of ornamental plants.
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Can intercropping make fall armyworm’s natural enemies more effective?

Maize farmers intecropping with sunflowers
Native to tropical and sub-tropical America, the highly invasive fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda was first reported in Africa in 2016. The pest quickly spread to every country in sub-Saharan Africa, reaching Zambia in late 2016. Fall armyworm larvae feed on over 80 different host plants, including maize – a key subsistence crop for millions…
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Could Telenomus remus go global?

colourful maize varieties
The parasitoid wasp Telenomus remus has been mass released as a biological control agent against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in the Americas (where the pest is native) for a number of years. However, fall armyworm is now highly invasive, found across Africa, Asia, and Australia. Can the lessons learnt from its wide use in the…
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Satellite data offers alternative in predicting impact of biological control for hay-fever causing ragweed

Ophraella communa (Ragweed Leaf Beetle); adult. Rock Creek Park,
New research – published in the journal Ecological Modelling – reveals an alternative method of predicting population trends through temperature of the leaf beetle Ophraella communa, a potential biological control agent of the hay-fever causing ragweed Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe.
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Women and girls in science: An interview with Hariet Hinz

Female scientists. Hariet Hinz
Female scientists have the potential to play an important role in the future of agriculture, however, a significant gender gap persists, particularly in agriculture and science.   Gender and youth is a key area for CABI. Constituting to Sustainable Development Goal 5, CABI’s goal is to create opportunities for women and young people in agriculture.   In…
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Women and girls in science: An interview with Chapwa Kasoma

Women and Girls in Science, Chapwa Kasoma
This month’s International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to engage women and girls in science. As part of this international day, we are highlighting some of the invaluable work CABI’s female scientists do in the field of agricultural science.   Zambia-based Chapwa Kasoma is a postdoctoral research fellow in invasive species management. We…
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Why the invasive apple snail is causing Kenya’s basmati rice to lose its sweet smell of productivity

ice-paddies-g7473e8c78_1280
Kenya’s Mwea Irrigation Settlement Scheme (MIS) is located in Kirinyaga County and falls within two sub counties – Mwea East and Mwea, writes Harrison Rware and Fernadis Makale who are both intrigued by the invasive apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) pest which is wreaking havoc in the fields of concerned rice farmers.
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DNA from thin air: could invasive species be monitored using airborne DNA?

DNA
Invasive species are notoriously challenging to track due to their ability to rapidly spread from one habitat to another, whilst their impacts on endangered species can be even more difficult to detect. Two new studies published in the journal Current Biology have now shown that it is possible to accurately identify a variety of animal…
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CABI research referenced in study assessing potential spread of fall armyworm in Africa and beyond

Extension-worker-in-Yambio-showing-the-FAW-larvae-on-maize
A new study looking at the potential distribution of the devastating fall armyworm in Africa and beyond with emphasis on the influence of climate change and irrigation patterns has drawn upon previous research and expertise from CABI.
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Invasives most read blogs 2021

As 2021 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the most read blogs on the Invasives Blog this year. Plus some firm favourites. Invasive species like Himalayan balsam, fall armyworm, and Tuta absoluta proved to be popular topics for our readers this year. CABI’s work in biological control around the world also grabbed readers’…
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