Tackle invasive species to restore degraded landscapes

By Gilbert Nakweya
Reblogged from SciDev.Net

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Prosopis and Lantana, two invasive woody shrubs that have been encroaching on Kenyan grazing and agricultural lands. Copyright: Panos

Invasive alien species should not be used in restoring degraded landscapes as their costs outweigh their benefits, experts say.

Invasive alien species, according to the Convention on Biological Diversity, are plants, animals and other organisms that are non-native to an ecosystem, and may adversely affect human health and the environment, including decline or elimination of native species.

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Invasive alien plants, land degradation and restoration

Reblogged from Global Landscapes Forum

Invasive alien plants contribute to land degradation by forming vast unproductive monocultures. These invasions have a negative impact on biodiversity, water resources, crop and pasture production, human and animal health, and as such undermine Africa’s ability to achieve its Sustainable Development Goals. Landscapes degraded as a result of unsustainable land-use practices are also more likely to be invaded by invasive plant species, making any attempts at restoration considerably more difficult. As such it is imperative that invasive species management forms an integral part of any attempt at landscape restoration. By actively removing invasive species, followed by restoration, livelihood outcomes will be enhanced across the continent.

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