Invasion of a predator: Lionfish

By Rebecca Quarterman and Hannah Fielder

lionfish
Lionfish populations continue to expand, threatening the well-being of coral reefs and other marine ecosystems (Image: Pixabay)

The majestic, unusual looking Lionfish could be seen as harmless to the untrained eye. Yet, this invasive species has multiplied aggressively over the last two decades to become a serious threat to biodiversity in the marine setting.

The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) and the devil firefish (Pterois miles) are native to the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean respectively, though their ranges overlap in the waters around Indonesia. These two species are collectively known as lionfish and are so similar in appearance that scientists usually rely on genetic analysis to tell them apart. Thriving on coral reefs and among mangroves and seagrass, lionfish have distinctive white and red/brown striped bodies and venomous spines on their fins to protect them from predators.

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