Invasive alien plants, land degradation and restoration

Reblogged from Global Landscapes Forum

Invasive alien plants contribute to land degradation by forming vast unproductive monocultures. These invasions have a negative impact on biodiversity, water resources, crop and pasture production, human and animal health, and as such undermine Africa’s ability to achieve its Sustainable Development Goals. Landscapes degraded as a result of unsustainable land-use practices are also more likely to be invaded by invasive plant species, making any attempts at restoration considerably more difficult. As such it is imperative that invasive species management forms an integral part of any attempt at landscape restoration. By actively removing invasive species, followed by restoration, livelihood outcomes will be enhanced across the continent.

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Plans for strategic action to tackle invasive species in Africa advance

InvasivesAfrica - RogerDennisArne
CABI speakers at the recent Tackling Invasive Species in Africa Workshop in Nairobi.
Left to right: Dr Roger Day (Programme Executive, Invasive Species), Dr Dennis Rangi (Director General, International Development), and Dr Arne Witt (Coordinator, Invasive Species Management)

Plans towards developing a comprehensive strategy that will enable sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to deal more proactively and effectively with invasive species have advanced significantly.

This milestone has been achieved through a recently concluded workshop co-organised by the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and CABI, with support from the Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC).

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