Tree of heaven: can a mite reduce the spread of this highly invasive pest?

Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is an invasive, fast-growing deciduous tree that causes damage to infrastructure and hosts some invasive species. Scientists as CABI and BBCA have identified a mite that could significantly reduce its impact.
Read Further

Mitigating the growth of toadflax: a CABI interview

Yellow toadflax
Native to Europe, Yellow toadflax and Dalmatian toadflax can typically be found on roadsides, grasslands and in crop fields. Like many other weeds, toadflaxes have been introduced to North America as decorative plants but they are now having adverse effects. Whilst these weeds may look pretty and provide decorative appeal, they soon escape cultivation and can…
Read Further

Halting the spread of Himalayan balsam: a CABI interview

With its bright pink flowers and fairly common appearance in Europe, and North America, when Himalayan balsam blossoms it can grow up to two metres tall with rough, reddish stems and shiny oval-shaped leaves. As alluring as it sounds, this plant, frequently found along waterways or damp areas, is highly invasive and causes a number…
Read Further

Combating desert locusts: a CABI interview

desert locust
The destructive force of desert locusts and grasshoppers can devastate crops across many regions of Africa and Asia, with swarms of locusts capable of causing widespread damage to crops, severely damaging livelihoods and increasing the risk of acute food instability. CABI has been using its extensive expertise in managing invasive insects, through early action and…
Read Further

Development communication campaign promotes sustainable management of fall armyworm in Kenya

CABI and the Cereal Growers Association (CGA) have been sharing information with farmers in Kenya on how to effectively and safely manage the continuing threat of the invasive fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda). This was achieved thanks to a  development communication campaign that combined video sharing through a network of lead farmers and social media.
Read Further