Invasive weeds in America’s Western states: restoring balance using biological control

In many of America’s Western states, invasive weeds such as houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), yellow and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria vulgaris and Linaria dalmatica), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), and hoary cress (Lepidium draba) are serious problems. However, research shows that biological control, as part of an integrated weed management strategy, offers the potential for a cost effective and efficient way of reducing invasive plant species to levels below acceptable damage thresholds.
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FAW Infestation: CABI, MoFA, others explore safe & sustainable management control

As part of efforts to sustainably manage the Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Ghana, the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s (MoFA) Plant Protection Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) in collaboration with the University of Ghana Soil and Irrigation Research Centre (SIREC) at Kpong have begun exploring biological control options for safe and sustainable management of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in the country.
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CABI refurbishes MoFA laboratory for biological control of invasive species in Ghana

Through its global Action on Invasives (AoI) programme, CABI has refurbished a laboratory housed by the Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA-PPRSD). The lab supports research efforts aimed at discovering and promoting locally practicable biological control solutions for managing invasive species in Ghana. The refurbishment consisted of…
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Tomato farmers in Kenya willing to use integrated pest management and bioproducts to manage Tuta absoluta

Tomato is an important crop in meeting domestic nutritional food requirements as well as in income generation and creation of employment for both rural and urban populations in Kenya. However, tomato production is facing serious challenges from the invasive pest, Tomato leafminer (Tuta absoluta.) Since 2014, T.absoluta has become the most serious threat to the sustainable production…
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Is parthenium’s stem boring weevil safe for release in Pakistan? An update on host range testing

Dr Kazam Ali examining Tagetes erecta plant species for any eggs
Native to tropical America, Parthenium hysterophorus, commonly known as parthenium, has invaded and become a major weed in over 50 countries. Parthenium has covered thousands of hectares of productive and range land in Pakistan. It is an annual herb which effects agriculture, damages biodiversity, affects human and animal health and adversely impacts economic development.
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Learning about the commercial aspects of biological control to combat pests and new invasive threats in Pakistan

Biological control is a key element of an integrated pest management strategy. Not only is it environmentally safe but it is also important for sustainable crop production. Among various biocontrol methods, increasing the presence of natural enemies is an effective substitute when they are not sufficiently abundant or effective.
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Continuing the biological fight against a hardy foe – the maize-devastating western corn rootworm

CABI is continuing the fight against the maize-devastating western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) by collecting more than 22,000 live specimens of this chrysomelid beetle for further research into its biological control. Dr Stefan Toepfer has been busy in the maize fields of southern Hungary gathering the insects, which, of Mexican origin, have invaded many maize…
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Colony of weevils safely in CABI Pakistan quarantine

A colony of 200 Listronotus (Listronotus setosipennis) have been safely transported from South Africa to Pakistan. The stem mining weevil is a biological control agent against parthenium. CABI’s Dr Philip Weyl, with the help of Dr Lorraine Strathie (ARC-PPRI) successfully imported the weevils into the new quarantine facility at CABI’s Central and Western Asia (CWA)…
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Scientists confirm first report of egg parasitoid in Africa to fight devastating fall armyworm

A group of scientists have confirmed the first report of an egg parasitoid Telenomus remus in Africa which could prove an important biological weapon in the fight against the devastating fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) that threatens the food security of more than 200 million people.
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CABI scientists are leading the fight to control one of the UK’s most invasive weeds – Himalayan balsam

CABI experts in the field of classical biological control are leading the fight to manage one of the UK’s most invasive weeds – Himalayan balsam – thanks to the nationwide release of the rust fungus Puccinia komarovii var. glanduliferae. Dr Carol Ellison, who has over 30 years’ experience of the biological control of weeds using…
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