Scientists exchange expertise on biocontrol agents for the management of devastating fall armyworm

FAW-Malvika
Since 2018, CABI has been actively supporting research on fall armyworm (FAW) management in India and Bangladesh while working closely with their national research institutes – the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insect Resources (NBAIR) and the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI).
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Scaling up biocontrol of fall armyworm: CABI scientists share expertise in ASEAN technical workshop

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CABI scientists have shared their expertise on the use of safer-to-use and more sustainable biocontrols of the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) as part of an ASEAN Technical Workshop Series on how to tackle the devastating crop pest.
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CABI research on desert locusts helps safeguard the food crops of millions

juvenile locust swarm
In 2019-2020, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), around 20 million people in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda faced acute food insecurity due to swarms of desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria). In Kenya, the outbreak represented the worst locust crisis in 70 years; by its peak, the country was tackling over…
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CABI trains provincial agriculture departments on biocontrol agents of fall armyworm and parthenium in Pakistan

Under its Action on Invasives (AoI) programme CABI in Pakistan organized two training sessions for rearing biocontrol agents to manage fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) in December, 2020.
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Spotlight turned on crop pest biocontrol in Latin America

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The spotlight has been turned on the use of biocontrol for crop pest management, as part of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programmes in Latin America, during a key note address to the II Congress of Applied Biological Control in Ecuador given by CABI’s Dr Yelitza Colmenarez.
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Busy in biocontrol: spotlight on weed researcher Jennifer Andreas

US scientists inspecting biocontrols on Dalmatian toadflax
Meet Jennifer Andreas, who has collaborated with CABI on a number of biological control projects since 2000, in this profile originally published by the North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA).
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Establishing parthenium leaf beetle (Zygogramma bicolorata) at new sites in Pakistan

Zygogramma beetles on parthenium in Pakistan
Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus) is an aggressive herbaceous plant native to north-east Mexico and is endemic in America, with no economic importance reported. This invasive weed has spread to over 50 countries, including Pakistan. Parthenium is prolific, yielding thousands of small white flowers each forming five seeds and on reaching maturity results in a huge number of…
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CABI supports first Dutch field trials with exotic insect to combat Japanese knotweed

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For the first time in the Netherlands, an exotic insect species is released into the wild to combat a harmful plant species. The Japanese knotweed psyllid should offer relief against the rampant Asian knotweed. Suzanne Lommen of the Institute of Biology Leiden is coordinating the field trials as part of a consortium which includes CABI,…
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A plague during a pandemic: how to increase resilience against the desert locust outbreak

desert locust alone in a tree
On 12 October, as part of a virtual side event for the World Food Prize’s annual Borlaug Dialogue, CABI hosted a panel session on A plague during a pandemic: how to increase resilience against the desert locust outbreak. The webinar aimed to communicate the urgent need for a comprehensive and coordinated response to this year’s…
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Invasive weeds in America’s Western states: restoring balance using biological control

In many of America’s Western states, invasive weeds such as houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), yellow and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria vulgaris and Linaria dalmatica), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), and hoary cress (Lepidium draba) are serious problems. However, research shows that biological control, as part of an integrated weed management strategy, offers the potential for a cost effective and efficient way of reducing invasive plant species to levels below acceptable damage thresholds.
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