Major invasive pest found for the first time on agricultural land in Europe

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The Oriental Fruit Fly (© Florida Division of Plant Industry)

Eight oriental fruit flies (Bactrocera dorsalis), considered the world’s worst invasive fruit fly, have been found at two monitoring stations in Italy. Annually, there are several reports of this species being found in infested fruit in France, Switzerland and the UK, and one individual was found in a trap in an Austrian fruit market in 2016. This current report, however, is the first time this species has been found on agricultural land in Europe.

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CABI scientist helps identify alien species that present greatest threat to European biodiversity

Fox squirrel
Fox squirrels are able to establish viable populations from a very small number of individuals

CABI scientist Dr Marc Kenis has joined an international team of researchers who have identified 66 alien species – not yet established in the European Union – that pose the greatest threat to European biodiversity and ecosystems as outlined in a new paper published today in the journal Global Change Biology.

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Breathe easy with biocontrol

Sneeze

One in four people in Europe suffer from hay fever, affecting the quality of life of millions. The average cost of hay fever related diseases amounts to around €600 per patient per year from treatment costs and lost time working.

One of the worst offending invasive plants for hay fever sufferers is the North American common ragweed Ambrosia artemisiifolia.

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Why biological control is an important tool to manage problematic invasive species in Europe

Written by Dr Urs Schaffner, head of the Ecosystem Management section at CABI Europe-Switzerland.

Melanagromyza albocilia (1)Over the last few years, biological invasions have become a regular topic in the news. Today the general public is probably better informed about the negative environmental and economic impacts alien invasive species can cause than ever before. However, concern about invasive species and the search for methods to sustainably manage them has a much longer history, dating back to the 19th century.

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Controlling the European earwig on the Falklands

Contributed by Norbert Maczey, CABI

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The European earwig, Forficula auricularia (Photo: Norbert Maczey, CABI)

The European Earwig, Forficula auricularia (order Dermaptera) was recently introduced to the Falkland Islands and has since become locally common in Port Stanley and a number of settlements in both East and West Falkland. Since its introduction this invasive species has caused considerable problems ranging from yield losses in horticulture to health and safety issues (eg. hiding behind rubber seals in oxygen masks or in asthma inhalers) and threats to the indigenous ecosystems. There are now worrying observations of earwigs away from settlements indicating a considerable threat to the composition of native invertebrate communities. The exact date when earwigs were first introduced is unknown but early records stem from as far back as 1997. Earwigs have become a real nuisance pest since the mid-2000s. Continue reading

New European Union IAS Regulation

 

Hydrocotyle ranunculoides
Floating pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides): on the EU species of Union concern list and a target for biocontrol (Credit: Kate Constantine, CABI)

Invasive alien species are a major threat worldwide, impacting upon millions of livelihoods and threatening biodiversity. The situation is worsening, due in no small part to increased global trade and transport. The economic costs of IAS can be vast: worldwide, invasive species are estimated to cost US$1.4 trillion per year – close to 5% of global GDP.

In the European Union alone, invasive alien species (IAS) are estimated to cost €12-20 billion a year.

In response to this threat, the European Union adopted Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 which makes compulsory the management of key IAS that are of concern to the region. Methods include limitation of spread, eradication of early invasions and active management of established IAS. A list of 37 species to be included under the regulation was approved by EU Member States in December 2015 and has recently come into force (Regulation (EU) 2016/1141). It includes 23 animals and 14 plants whose current and potential impacts across the region will mean that collaborative and concerted action is required across the EU.

This is part of the EU’s biodiversity strategy which aims to halt the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the EU by 2020 and is in line with the Convention on Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Aichi Targets, particularly Target 9:

“By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.”

At CABI, we have been working on invasive species at a global scale for decades and are experts in their management using both traditional methods and through biological control. This new legislation is welcome; recognising the serious threats that invasive species pose and imposing compulsory measures to lessen the spread and impacts of IAS in the EU.

Weevil fight them on the waterbodies

Introduced to Britain in the 1980s through the aquatic trade Hydrocotyle ranunculoides, commonly known as floating pennywort, is rapidly spreading through Europe and particularly in the UK, Belgium, Germany, Italy, France and the Netherlands. Originating in Central and South America, this stoloniferous perennial plant is forming dense, impenetrable mats which rapidly dominate water bodies, outcompeting and displacing native species and compromising flood defences, navigation and leisure activities.  Despite its relatively recent introduction, establishment and spread have been exponential thanks largely to its extremely fast growth rate (up to 20cm per day) and its ability to re-generate from small fragments. In 2010, floating pennywort was added to section 14, schedule 9 of the UK’s Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.  A recent report estimates its cost to Great Britain’s economy as £25.5 million each year through management, disposal, flooding and indirect costs to boating and angling.  News that from 2014 the sale of this plant will be banned is significant and welcomed.

Left - A sheep in a UK river clogged with Hydrocotyle (Credit: Trevor Renals); Right - Distribution map of floating pennywort invasion (Credit: DAISIE)
Left – A sheep in a UK river clogged with Hydrocotyle (Credit: Trevor Renals, Environment Agency)
Right – Distribution map of floating pennywort invasion (Credit: DAISIE)

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