Predicting the spread of invasive spotted lanternfly

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is an emerging insect pest of a number of economically important crop plants. Originating from China, its primary host plant is tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), which is itself considered to be a noxious invasive species in some areas of the United States.
Read Further

CABI updates International Soft Fruit Conference on fight against devastating invasive fruit fly

CABI scientist Dr Lukas Seehausen has updated delegates at the International Soft Fruit Conference in s-Hertogenbosch, in the Netherlands, on the very latest research in the fight against the devasting fruit fly Drosophila suzukii. Dr Seehausen, a research scientist in risk analysis and invasion ecology based at CABI’s Swiss centre in Delémont, said a biological control agent – the parasitoid Ganaspis…
Read Further

Using DNA to detect a stinkbug invasion

The use of DNA to detect a stinkbug invasion proposes a revolutionary advancement in agricultural pest surveillance following the success recorded on a piloted experiment conducted on farms in the USA. These interlopers attack all manner of produce, ranging from fruits to leafy vegetables.  However, the adoption of DNA techniques in detecting its early invasion…
Read Further

Classical biological control of Drosophila suzukii with Asian parasitoids

The soft-fruit pest Drosophila suzukii, or spotted-wing drosophila (SWD), is particularly difficult to control because of its short generation time and its very broad host range, including many wild and ornamental plants. The pest has been causing damage to fruit crop in Europe as well as North America where damages costing $500million were reported in…
Read Further