CABI-led study recommends improvements to how impacts of Non-Native Species are assessed

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A farmer sets a pheromone trap to fight tomato leaf miner

CABI has led an international team of Non-Native Species (NNS) specialists who have compiled a list of recommendations to improve the way in which the impact of a range of invasive pests – such as the tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta – are assessed, potentially helping towards ensuring greater global food security.

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New upgraded invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool launched

Nezara viridula (green stink bug); mated pair, on pearl millet (

Last week CABI launched the full version of its invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool, a free and open access online resource available via the Invasive Species Compendium that helps users make decisions about invasive species and identify possible risks in countries, provinces and states.

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CABI’s ISC datasheets contribute to regulatory action against high-risk freshwater invasive species in the USA

<i>Rutilus rutilus</i> (roach); adult fish on display. Subaqueous Vltava, Prague Czech Republic. April, 2011 (Copyright: released into the public Domain by Larel Jakubec/Prague, Czech Republic)
Rutilus rutilus (roach); adult fish on display. Subaqueous Vltava, Prague Czech Republic. April, 2011 (Copyright: released into the public Domain by Larel Jakubec/Prague, Czech Republic)

Aquatic invasive species threaten aquatic resources by negatively impacting native organisms and altering ecosystems. They have a competitive advantage over native species because they lack natural enemies to control their spread, they grow and reproduce rapidly, and also adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions.

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