5 invasive species to look out for in the US

The presence of invasive species poses a significant hazard to many native environments and species found in the United States. They lead to significant expenses in agriculture, forestry, and recreation. Once out of control, they can destroy entire ecosystems, causing environmental, social, and financial problems. In fact, their presence is costing the US up to…
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Russian knapweed biological control success with host specific wasps and midges

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By Sonya Daly, Dan Bean and Melanie Mollack of the Colorado Department of Agriculture, Conservation Services, Biological Control Program. Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens) is a nonnative weed in the western United States. It was introduced in the late 1800’s and is now invading and degrading cropland, rangeland, riparian areas, and roadsides.
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Invasive weeds in America’s Western states: restoring balance using biological control

In many of America’s Western states, invasive weeds such as houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), yellow and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria vulgaris and Linaria dalmatica), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), and hoary cress (Lepidium draba) are serious problems. However, research shows that biological control, as part of an integrated weed management strategy, offers the potential for a cost effective and efficient way of reducing invasive plant species to levels below acceptable damage thresholds.
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