Joint forces against highly invasive Fall Armyworm Pest

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Invasive Species Are Riding on Plastic Across the Oceans

Reblogged from National Geographic We know plastics are as plentiful in parts of the open ocean as they are in our everyday lives. But, until recently, scientists didn’t consider that such debris could also be carrying a new wave of invasive species to the shores of the United States. Now they’re finding that not only is…
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A crisis is a terrible thing to waste

Reblogged from AGRF Last year, the Fall armyworm destroyed swathes of agricultural production across Africa, devastating maize crops in more than 40 countries and placing at risk the food security and livelihoods of some 300 million people.
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CABI calls for urgent action to tackle the global spread of invasive species

In response to the growing threat of invasive species, the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) has called for urgent action to tackle the global spread of invasive species, even as the recent fall armyworm outbreak casts doubts over Africa and Asia’s preparedness to fight the scourge. CABI is a not-for-profit organisation that draws…
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Where next for fall armyworm?

Since its confirmed arrival in Nigeria in 2016, the fall armyworm has conquered almost 25.5 million square kilometres of Sub-Saharan Africa, reaching as far east as Ethiopia, and as far south as South Africa. Now fall armyworm has reached beyond African shores and was recently confirmed in India, with CABI warning of its now impending…
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Fall armyworm’s spread to India making headlines around the world

Earlier this month, CABI warned of the impending rapid spread of fall armyworm across Asia, following its arrival in India. Since then, news of the crop-destroying pest’s invasion has been hitting headlines across the globe.
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Invasive species: the threat to human health

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Back from the brink: how biocontrol saved St Helena’s national tree from extinction

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Fall Armyworm Is Here to Stay. But We Can Manage.

By Roger Day. Reblogged from Fall Armyworm Tech Prize In 1996 in response to the first international meeting on invasive alien species, the Global Invasive Species Programme (GISP) a collaboration between the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI), the International Union for Conservation (IUCN), and the Scientific Committee for Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), was…
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Does travel stress strengthen invasiveness?

cargo ship on the Bosphorus
Research has already shown that invasive species tend to be more tolerant to environmental stress than related non-invasive species. However, a recent study published in Biological Invasions, set out to discover whether this stress tolerance was an inherent trait or whether it was something acquired en route from their natural habitat to the new one.
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