How plant hunters sowed the seeds of garden invaders

Rhododendron ponticum
Plant hunters introduced many of the UK’s most damaging invasive species as botanical status symbols in the Victorian era. Initially, the impact of plant hunting for sought-after specimens, such as camellia and rhododendrons, was largely unknown. However, without natural predators from their home range, these plants grew uncontrollably in British gardens and spread into the…
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Deadly cane toads make their mark on Australian wildlife and habitats

cane toad close up
The cane toad (Rhinella marina), also known as the giant toad, is a poisonous amphibian which is wreaking havoc throughout Australia. Native to South America, Central America and Mexico, the cane toad was introduced to many countries to help control agricultural pests.
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Zebra mussels disrupt ecosystems in Europe and North America

zebra mussel cluster
Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are fingernail-sized freshwater molluscs that are native to the lakes of south-east Russia. In the last 200 years they have spread to parts of Europe, including Britain and Ireland, and North America.
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Jumping worms unearth problems for forest ecosystems

jumping worm
The Asian jumping worm (Amynthas agrestis), also known as the crazy worm, is a litter dwelling earthworm which can harm forests and biodiversity by changing the soil structure and forest floor vegetation.
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