Invasive Species Compendium: Reviewing the benefits and uses

Invasive species compendium
The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), including e-resources, to deliver information has expanded rapidly in recent years and, as an academic publisher in the life sciences, online knowledge sharing has become an increasingly important goal for CABI. Our aim is to help people discover validated, evidence-based information to help them overcome the world’s…
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How does the Invasive Species Compendium help to manage the threat of invasive species?

FAW-larvae
Invasive species pose a massive economic challenge in many countries around the world.  Invasive weeds, insects and other animal pests, and plant and animal diseases have been introduced to regions outside their native distribution and, in the absence of sufficient natural control, are negatively impacting agriculture, forestry, livestock, aquaculture or delicate natural habitats.
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UK Invasive Species Week – how can we tackle some of the worst weeds in the UK?

Close up of Himalayan Balsam flower with a bee on it.
Today marks the beginning of UK Invasive Species Week (24-30 May) – a week to raise awareness about the threat of invasive species in the UK and the significant negative impacts they cause to our environment, our economy and our daily lives.
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Invasive Species Compendium use grows in 2020

In the first half of 2020, CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) had over 1.5 million visits, around double the number for the same period in 2019. How much of this is down to the demand for high quality content and improvements that have been made to the site, and how much is down to people…
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New TR4 Portal on the Invasive Species Compendium

bananas
At the end of 2019, a new species portal was added to CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) to bring together information and data related to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense tropical race 4, more commonly known as TR4. This portal, which is Open Access and available to all, brings together data on the current distribution, the…
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Invasives Most Read 2018

2018 has been a bumper year for the CABI Invasives blog, with 4 times more posts than 2017 and over twice the number of views (over 20,000!). With so many articles published this year, we have compiled a list of the top 20 most read to round off 2018.
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A new tool to identify potential invasive species threats

CABI has announced the beta launch of its invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool, a decision support aid to help users identify potential invasive species threats to a country, state or province. The tool is supported by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID). Gareth Richards, CABI’s Compendium Programme Manager,…
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A fifth of the world’s plants under threat, as report says 391,000 species now known to science

Dave Simpson – 11 May 2016 A ground-breaking report from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, has produced an estimate of the number of plants known to science. By searching through existing databases, the researchers have estimated that there are now 390,900 known plant species, of which around 369,400 are flowering plants. But this figure is…
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New in July 2015 from the ISC

In July 2015 the following datasheets were published on CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). You can explore the open-access ISC here: www.cabi.org/isc Akebia quinata (five-leaf akebia) – a highly invasive, aggressive vine native to East Asia, A. quinata has been introduced as an ornamental to Canada, Europe, Oceania and the USA. It can outcompete native understory plants…
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New in January 2015 from the ISC

In January 2015 the following datasheets were published on CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). You can explore the open-access ISC here: www.cabi.org/isc. Clerodendrum thomsoniae (bleeding glory bower) – native to West Africa, this vine has been widely cultivated in tropics and subtropics worldwide, and is naturalised in many places, including the USA, Australia and the Galapagos Islands.…
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