The life cycle of the golden apple snail

Golden apple snail
The Life cycle of the golden apple snail and its ability to grow and reproduce quickly makes it an incredibly successful invasive species. Golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculate, is widely considered one of the most invasive invertebrates of waterways and irrigation systems. The snails are able to spread through irrigation canals, natural water distribution pathways,…
Read Further

Remote sensing of highly invasive Parthenium weed in Pakistan

HawkPi flying over a field of Parthenium
Parthenium is a highly invasive plant species. It threatens agricultural productivity, biodiversity, and human and animal health wherever it takes root. In Pakistan, it’s called famine weed because of its devastating impact on crop yields and livelihoods.   
Read Further

Invasive snails: 4 species leaving a trail of destruction

Rosy predator snail
Invasive snails are some of the most damaging invasive species in the world. In invaded regions, they pose a threat to the environment, the economy, and in some cases, human health. Find out more about four of these invasive snails, including their native region, how they became established in invaded areas and the threat they…
Read Further

Can intercropping make fall armyworm’s natural enemies more effective?

Maize farmers intecropping with sunflowers
Native to tropical and sub-tropical America, the highly invasive fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda was first reported in Africa in 2016. The pest quickly spread to every country in sub-Saharan Africa, reaching Zambia in late 2016. Fall armyworm larvae feed on over 80 different host plants, including maize – a key subsistence crop for millions…
Read Further

Women and girls in science: An interview with Chapwa Kasoma

Women and Girls in Science, Chapwa Kasoma
This month’s International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to engage women and girls in science. As part of this international day, we are highlighting some of the invaluable work CABI’s female scientists do in the field of agricultural science.   Zambia-based Chapwa Kasoma is a postdoctoral research fellow in invasive species management. We…
Read Further

DNA from thin air: could invasive species be monitored using airborne DNA?

DNA
Invasive species are notoriously challenging to track due to their ability to rapidly spread from one habitat to another, whilst their impacts on endangered species can be even more difficult to detect. Two new studies published in the journal Current Biology have now shown that it is possible to accurately identify a variety of animal…
Read Further

Invasives most read blogs 2021

As 2021 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the most read blogs on the Invasives Blog this year. Plus some firm favourites. Invasive species like Himalayan balsam, fall armyworm, and Tuta absoluta proved to be popular topics for our readers this year. CABI’s work in biological control around the world also grabbed readers’…
Read Further

First parthenium biocontrol agent approved for release in Pakistan

Parthenium in Pakistan
The stem boring weevil Listronotus steosipennis has been approved for release as a biocontrol agent for the management of Parthenium hysterophorus in Pakistan. Parthenium has spread throughout much of the country causing problems in both rural and urban areas. It is hoped this weevil will prove a sustainable and effective management option for this invasive…
Read Further

COP26: climate change and its impact on invasive species

COP 26 and invasive species
Climate change is having an important influence on invasive species. The increase in temperatures, rainfall, humidity and drought can facilitate their spread and establishment, creating new opportunities for them to become invasive.
Read Further

Asian citrus greening disease: the threat to Africa’s citrus trade

lemons
The yield losses attributed to Asian citrus greening disease once established can be devastating. If the disease continues to spread unabated in the citrus growing regions of East Africa,  the annual value of lost production could potentially reach up to US$127 million over the next ten to 15 years, according to a recent paper published…
Read Further