Using animals in the fight against invasive species

bee or honeybee in Latin Apis Mellifera
Could honey bees (Apis mellifera) help in the fight against invasive species?

Whilst prevention is better than a cure, it is not always possible to stop every invasive species from entering an area. In these instances, early detection and rapid response are crucial, as management is much easier while the population of an invasive species remains small. Detection of small populations, however, can be incredibly difficult. With the spread of invasive species becoming an ever increasing problem around the world, it could pay to think outside the box when trying to manage them – could animals help with the fight against invasive species? Researchers and conservationists seem to think so. Continue reading

Is parthenium weed allergy problem worse than that of annual ragweed?

The CABI Blog

A small clump of field-growing parthenium weed plants approximately 80 days old Photo Credit: S. Adkins

By Asad Shabbir

Parthenium weed and annual ragweed are closely related members of the Asteraceae, known for their high allergenicity. The detrimental effects on human health of the more temperate annual ragweed are very well known. However, those of the more tropical parthenium weed are less well known and in fact much more severe, affecting many tens of millions of people each year.

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CABI scientist helps provide a comprehensive review of research on Tuta absoluta in Africa

Tuta absoluta  (tomato leafminer) larval damage on tomato (Lycop
Tuta absoluta (tomato leafminer) larval damage on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Photo: Marja van der Straten, NVWA Plant Protection Service, Netherlands.

The South American tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta, is a devastating invasive pest of tomato crops in several areas around the world, including Africa where the problem is greatest.  Given the wealth of research conducted on T. absoluta, a recent publication involving one of CABI’s scientists, Dr Marc Kenis, has compiled a comprehensive review of the current state of our knowledge and pinpointed important research areas for the future. Continue reading

Fall armyworm radio campaign for next growing season launches in Zambia

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CABI in partnership with Ministry of Agriculture in Zambia through the National Agricultural Information Services (NAIS) has launched a national radio campaign focusing on the identification, prevention and management of fall armyworm. The campaign aims to help smallholder farmers in Zambia minimise fall armyworm losses and learn how to safely use chemicals.

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CABI scientist helps identify alien species that present greatest threat to European biodiversity

Fox squirrel
Fox squirrels are able to establish viable populations from a very small number of individuals

CABI scientist Dr Marc Kenis has joined an international team of researchers who have identified 66 alien species – not yet established in the European Union – that pose the greatest threat to European biodiversity and ecosystems as outlined in a new paper published today in the journal Global Change Biology.

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Invasives Most Read 2018

Parthenium in Pakistan

2018 has been a bumper year for the CABI Invasives blog, with 4 times more posts than 2017 and over twice the number of views (over 20,000!). With so many articles published this year, we have compiled a list of the top 20 most read to round off 2018.

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Addressing the root of the problem — why plant health and evidenced-based interventions matter to global development

by Duncan Barker (Research and Evidence Division, DFID) and Dr Roger Day (CABI). Reblogged from the DFID Research blog.

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Global agriculture faces a myriad of threats, of which one of the greatest is invasive species. With no native organisms to control them, invasive species such as plant pests and diseases spread out of control, damaging crops and risking the food security of developing countries.

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