FAW Infestation: CABI, MoFA, others explore safe & sustainable management control

As part of efforts to sustainably manage the Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Ghana, the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s (MoFA) Plant Protection Regulatory Services Directorate (PPRSD) in collaboration with the University of Ghana Soil and Irrigation Research Centre (SIREC) at Kpong have begun exploring biological control options for safe and sustainable management of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in the country.
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CABI refurbishes MoFA laboratory for biological control of invasive species in Ghana

Through its global Action on Invasives (AoI) programme, CABI has refurbished a laboratory housed by the Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA-PPRSD). The lab supports research efforts aimed at discovering and promoting locally practicable biological control solutions for managing invasive species in Ghana. The refurbishment consisted of…
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Using online workshops to ensure the fight against invasive species continues in Pakistan

As the global COVID-19 pandemic continues, CABI is ensuring that efforts to combat invasive species are continuing. The CABI centre in Pakistan organized a one-day online workshop on the development of Pest Management Decision Guides (PMDGs) and Technical Briefs on the invasive pests: fall armyworm, parthenium weed, and Tuta absoluta.
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Communication is key: CABI publishes framework for strategic communications during pest outbreaks

The invasion of a highly destructive plant pest can have a devastating effect on farmers’ crop production, natural ecosystems and economic trade. In Africa, where a large proportion of people live in rural areas and rely on subsistence agriculture, invasive species can cause severe damage and seriously impact food and nutritional security.
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The future of fall armyworm research

As COVID-19 forces more and more people indoors, the challenges facing scientific research do not diminish. If anything, the sudden requirement to maintain a sensible distance between colleagues serves only to highlight the lack of resources currently available to facilitate remote working and collaboration in research circles.
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Preparando al productor para luchar contra el cogollero

El gusano cogollero (Spodoptera fugiperda) y otros gusanos masticadores son llamados “Langostas” por los productores en Somotillo y municipios aledaños, quizás devido a que la defoliación severa que causan les recuerda el daño causado por la langosta del desierto (Schistocerca gregaria). El cogollero es la plaga de mayor importancia para la producción de maíz en Nicaragua, sobre todo en el ciclo de primera, especialmente en localidades dentro del ‘corredor seco’ como Somotillo.
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Invasives Most Read 2019

As 2019 draws to a close, we have crunched the numbers and pulled together the year’s most read articles. Plus some firm favourites. Fall armyworm continues to be a popular topic for our readers and this year, blogs on biocontrol efforts to control the invasive caterpillar make the top 20. CABI’s Pest Risk Analysis tool…
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Study finds endoparasitoid wasp can reduce fall armyworm leaf consumption rate by up to 89%

Coccygidium luteum (Brullé)
In a recently published study led by CABI, researchers assessed, under lab conditions, the effect of the endoparasitoid wasp, Coccygidium luteum on the leaf rate consumption of its host – fall armyworm larvae.
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UAV spraying: combating the spread of fall armyworm across China

Fall armyworm (FAW) has continued to spread across China since early January, with the pest being identified in over 600,000 hectares of farmland across 18 provinces. Now, the government and farmers are looking for solutions to tackling this invasive species. Fall armyworm in an incredibly destructive pest species native to the tropics and sub-tropics of…
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Deploying biopesticides to combat fall armyworm in South Sudan

A new project in South Sudan is combatting the fall armyworm, an insect that can cause significant damage to crops, particularly maize. With more than half of South Sudan’s current population—nearly 6.2 million people—in need of life-saving food assistance, safeguarding food security where possible is essential. Launched in January 2019 as a partnership between CABI,…
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